tinmy2014

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  1. adidas brought a completely different visual experience to running with the original AlphaBounce. Does the equally jarring design of the AlphaBounce Instinct hold the performance torch? Here we go… The original adidas AlphaBounce was, at first, different. Patterned after the markings of a quail, used for camouflage, and developed using foot-mapping Aramis technology, the shoe was a serious bargain at only $100. That was two years ago so it was time to get different. The adidas AlphaBounce Instinct is that difference — it combines the best of the original and the follow-up AlphaBounce Beyond. adidas completely went away from the dot pattern of the original and opted to evolve the herringbone-style traction from the AlphaBounce Beyond. It isn’t a basketball herringbone, but angles and cuts across the foot from heel to toe that are then covered in Mars-surface texture. It’s leaps and bounds better than the original, which wasn’t bad at all. The AlphaBounce Instinct also felt more secure on wet surfaces like slick concrete or tile and even holds it own on hardwood. Continental rubber makes an appearance again, proving adidas is serious about durability, and since there was no signs of wear — except dirt — the outsole holds up great. One slight change is the almost-decoupled outsole. Cutaways under the arch make flexibility and transition smoother than the original or the AlphaBounce Beyond and the shoe, overall, just feels faster because of it — even though it is bulkier in the midsole than the original (about the same as the AB Beyond). With a name like the AlphaBounce Instinct, you know where we are going. Bounce was introduced almost three years ago in the Lillard 2 and it was a revelation — soft but responsive, low profile, a little heavy but resilient — and it worked well across all activities. The original AlphaBounce was incredibly smooth and impact-absorbing. The AlphaBounce Instinct follows the same suit — matter of fact, it feels like the exact same midsole. The initial impact is absorbed with no issues, no feedback coming back up your joints, and also no real feel of energy return. If you are looking for a Boost-like soft/spring, the Bounce midsoles don’t have the same feel. If you are looking for a quick, smooth transition that translates well into multiple activities, sometimes all at once (jumping into running into weightlifting) you will find Bounce a better system. Bounce is a fast-feeling foam — there is no lag time when landing and it provides a solid platform for propulsion. The original AlphaBounce had a Forged Mesh upper. The AlphaBounce Instinct has a Forged Mesh upper. Sounds the same, but it couldn’t feel further from the truth. While the original did feature the folds and seams like the AlphaBounce Instinct, it was a forgiving, pliable, and stretchy material that needed some help with containment and lateral stability. While most running shoes don’t need to worry about those issues, the alphaBounce crossed over into a workout shoes for all activities, which meant stability was a problem. The AlphaBounce Instinct is a stiffer Forged Mesh, much like what was used on the Dame 3, and lateral stability is almost basketball-shoe like. The folds and molds are still there for flexibility in the forefoot, so no worries about the transition and toe-off suffering if you actually use the shoe for running. The upper is a one-piece again, with a softer, spandex-like insert under the laces for ease of entry (the pull tabs on the tongue and heel help too). The inner lining gets the same smooth spandex-like materials as the tongue area and hotspots are nonexistent. One thing that was added was pillows around the ankle bone; there is one on the lateral and one on the medial side. These helped with any heel slip that might have been present — however, I lost one during a workout when it came unglued. It didn’t affect fit for the most part, but I could feel the empty space compared to the other shoe. Slight quality control issue, but nothing that destroys the review. The original Alpha was hella long — some people went down a full size because of the length in the toebox. The AlphaBounce Instinct is very similar; the toebox is about a half-size long, but I didn’t downsize for two reasons: first, the midfoot fit is a little narrower with the one-piece upper and midfoot support cage; second, the lacing system stops way before the toebox, so even a half-size down felt long. I decided to deal with some extra length to get the extra midfoot width, and it worked great for me. If you are a normal width and went half down on the original, I would recommend the same with the AlphaBounce Instinct. One thing the original missed, and we covered it above, was lateral stability. Again, as a true runner, it isn’t completely necessary, but with the crossover appeal stability is needed. The sole on the AlphaBounce Instinct has been widened and sits outside the foot and upper, leading to a super-stable base with outriggers like a basketball shoe. There is no feeling of tipping or rolling at all while wearing the shoe. Additionally, the stiffer Forged Mesh holds your foot over the footbed without feeling restrictive at all while the waves and folds keep it flexible. As for the midfoot, you might have noticed the black lace pieces. Yeah, those are cool. What you might not have seen is that they are independent of the upper (I figured this out while writing this review and I’ve had the shoe for almost a month). The pieces pull completely away from the upper and are attached to the midfoot shank, tying the lateral support into the sole for extra stability. It’s a welcome concept, but I was ready to send my pair back because I thought they came unglued. The Torsion Bridge, as it’s called, works to allow the forefoot and heel to operate separately, almost decoupled, while still providing the arch support to keep your foot from flexing in the wrong way. Magic. While the original AlphaBounce was a straight running shoe, the AlphaBounce Instinct has been redesigned for more than that; adidas.com says the shoe is “recommended for: Multidirectional movements, running for your sport, and agility training movements.” adidas seemed to realize how much this shoe was worn for everything but running, and I have seen more than one pair of the original on basketball courts, used as a cross-trainer in the weight room, and on treadmills. If you are looking for an all-around shoe for multiple activities, with cushioning good enough for running or basketball, a court-friendly traction pattern, and support and containment for almost any level of lateral movements, look no further — the AlphaBounce Instinct will cover anything you throw at it. Also, let’s be honest — the upper is eye-catching and unique, and that never hurts. The minimal branding and the way the upper flows into the midsole creates a kd 11 for sale that looks like nothing else on shelves today. With the popularity of the original AlphaBounce (that shoe came out two years ago and is still on store shelves), it is no wonder adidas keeps new models coming. And as long as they keep performing like the AlphaBounce Instinct, they should never stop.
  2. “Make the old new again” — that’s the mantra of retro product, right? Well, Nike and Kobe Bryant decided to take those words to the next level with the Zoom Kobe 1 Protro, which debuted for All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles. The original Kobe 1 was an absolute killer on court, so does the “new and improved” build match up? Here we go… If there was a ranking higher than Hall of Fame, the Kobe 1 Protro would get it. Using the exact same pattern as the original Kobe was a great thing because it sticks like glue to any floor. Plus, it’s thick and hard enough to hoop in outdoors. The herringbone is multi-directional and spaced wide enough that dust is no issue. During one wear at 24 Hour Fitness — a four-game session of full court — I made a point to count how many times I wiped… Two times, that’s all. That is amazing. Since the first Kobe came out over 13 years ago, this traction has been one of my favorites, and it still is. Keep your storytelling — give me herringbone. Full-length Zoom is rarely a bad thing, right? Right, especially when it is responsive and protects from impact. The Kobe 1 Protro is both. The Zoom unit can be felt as soon as you step down on that first wear and it only gets better as the midsole foam begins breaking in. It isn’t a LeBron 15 Max Zoom feeling — this is fast and agile, because that’s what Zoom was meant to be before it became an impact-absorbing monster. Don’t get me wrong – impact protection was there, as I never felt anything jarring while playing or excessive aching afterwards (well, no more than my age would allow). It’s just that when Zoom appeared, it was the low, fast, speedy, responsive cushioning while Air Max was the impact protection. Now it seems Zoom is marketed as impact protection. No difference here because the Kobe 1 Protro keeps doing it and doing it and doing it well. One minor addition to the shoe that was found in the original but not in many other shoes is the Poron inserts on the bottom of the insole. Poron in a highly resilient, highly responsive urethane (usually blue) that can be placed in thin layers on the undersides of insoles — usually in the heel and forefoot — that adds a little initial impact protection without adding a ton of weight or height. The original had these as well, and for step-in comfort it can’t be beat. This is it: leather, suede, and leather, and more suede. I won’t say this is premium leather, because it isn’t — if it was we would be paying $400 for these. This is the leather for leather-lovers that play ball, at least. It is thick and takes a couple of hard wears to break in and crease, but when it does, it forms to the foot and feels great. Durability is also a plus as the Kobe 1 Protro is built like a tank (yet hard to hit). I am still playing in my original Kobe 1 and the Kobe 1 Protro feels like it will still be playable in 13 years as well. The medial side is made up of a nubuck that, again, feels like the best you can get at this price point for basketball. It is smooth and soft and should take a couple of wears to crease and feel right, but when it does…yeah. Carbon fiber — what appears to be real carbon fiber — comes back for the heel cup and midfoot shank, and it is so nice (more on that in Support). The only real change on the Kobe 1 Protro as far as materials is the Pro Combat in the ankle collar and the missing leather circles that covered the ankle bones. Not a big change and neither one makes a difference in performance, so no harm, no foul. The one area on the Kobe 1 Protro Reviews that takes some work is fit, and it all goes back to the previous category, the materials. As anyone who has played in a ton of leather shoes from the ’90s and early ’00s will tell you, most leather shoes take a couple of wears to crease and “learn” the foot. All those wrinkles mean the shoe is learning to flex and shape to your foot and activity. The Kobe 1 Protro is no different. The leather upper is backed internally by a layer of foam that gives the shoe a bulky, disconnected feeling, at first. You can pull the laces as tight as you want but there is still a feeling of dead space in the forefoot. No worries! Just let the shoe break in and fit improves dramatically after the second or third day of playing. Length-wise, stay true to size. Again, it may feel like you should have went a half-size down, but let the shoe break in before panicking. Heel slip is non-existent as long as you lace tight. The hole in the collar was seen as gimmicky when first released but does allow for ankle mobility while also locking the heel in and stopping movement. One note: lace behind the Shozoku logo on the tongue. It will make locking the laces down tight easier. The Kobe 1 Protro offers serious support with tools in just about every category. Starting at the bottom, the base is wide and features a large outrigger on the lateral forefoot. Above that outrigger, we get foam teeth rising from the midsole over the side of the foot; they keep any lateral movements locked and caged so your foot doesn’t slide off the footbed on your Kobe-copying-Dirk one legged fadeaways. In the midfoot, we get a carbon fiber shank that keeps the arch and midfoot rigid and supported. That shank ties into a carbon piece that circles around the heel cup, tying the midfoot to the back of the shoe. Let’s face it — even if your foot asks for permission, nicely, it ain’t getting out. Moving up, the leather and nubuck upper may eventually stretch out and become a bit sloppy, but the lacing system allows the upper to be pulled tight in all directions, so even if the Kobe 1 Protro does lose a little shape over the years, just yank harder and you’re good to go. It is only March, but the Kobe 1 Protro has the potential to be my Performer of the Year. It may be an opinion clouded in sentiment, as the Kobe I is my second favorite Kobe shoe ever (behind the VI), but there is no denying it: the Protro is a great, great, great performer. If you can put up with a little extra weight (supposedly lighter materials were used, but these were within an ounce of the original Kobe I in my size 10.5) and a short break-in time, you will be blessed with a serious shoe. If you want light, thin, minimal, non-supportive uppers you may want to keep looking. The Kobe 1 Protro should suit any player at any position, period, and if you wore the Kobe 1 the first time around and liked it, look no further. With more colorways soon to come, don’t miss the chance to wear the latest, greatest Nike performer — that first appeared 13 years ago.
  3. The Nike PG 2 is the latest to be deconstructed by the good folks over at 2018jordans.com. Yes, it pains us to look at images such as these as well. The fact that these shoes could have gone to someone in need of a new pair of sneakers makes images like this hard to see. However, chopping them up is for educational purposes and taking apart the shoes long after they’ve been used doesn’t do anyone any good as this type of information should be available as soon as possible. With so many product descriptions being wrong or outdated nowadays, we feel this type of thing is important — which is why we support the folks over at 2018jordans.com. So, we feel your pain. Just know that we’re at least learning something. The profile shot is a simple one; it shows us everything without saying anything at all — where the cushion is located, and how thick/thin it is. You’re also able to see how padded the interior of the shoe is, whether there is a heel to toe drop, which there almost always is, and how significant it is. Beautiful. Isn’t it? Layers. So many wonderful layers. Here you can see the partial internal bootie, which makes it much easier to get the shoe on and off, and the upper’s build and external Adaptive Fit forefoot straps. The heel padding sticks out to us the most; that area of the shoe was really well done and features lots of nicely sculpted padding for comfort and proper fit. Reinforcing soft textiles when they’re placed in stress zones is essential, not only for the longevity of the material but also for the safety of the player wearing the shoe — no matter the player’s skill level. In my performance review I had stated that this Zoom Air setup felt as close to being Unlocked Zoom as possible without it actually being Unlocked Zoom. What this image shows is that it’s exactly like Unlocked Zoom Air with the exception of a moderator plate. You can also see one of the reasons why the heel portion of the foam midsole is more comfortable than that of the Nike PG 1. This heel section of the midsole is cored out around the impact zone which allows for the foam to compress a lot more. This, coupled with a slightly altered foam density, made for a very comfortable and well balanced ride during our testing. Don’t get too excited regarding cushioning; the forefoot Zoom Air unit is 10mm thick according to Nike. Yes, this one is over 11mm, which makes us think that quality control isn’t perfect and there will be variations and/or defects within production runs of footwear. This isn’t a Nike problem though, it’s normal for any company manufacturing something at such a high volume. Torsional support comes in the form of this tiny TPU bar, which is now the norm for most models. It works just fine, but definitely could be better or more substantial. There looks to be an 8mm drop from the heel to toe. Some don’t mind the drop while others loath it. Below is a side by side comparison of the PG 1 and PG 2. The Nike PG 2 is definitely an upgrade in the cushion department. Nothing about how the shoe feels on-foot and on-court makes you feel as if you’re wearing a budget model — despite its $110 price tag. We hope you enjoyed the detailed look and breakdown of the Nike PG 2 deconstructed. Feel free to share your thoughts on the dissection below in the comment section.
  4. Jordan Brand brings back the iconic Air Jordan 3 Black Cement to celebrate the model’s 30th Anniversary, which will also included Nike Air heels. For the occasion, we put them up against DJ Khaled’s highly demanded Air Jordan 3 We The Best rendition. Designed by DJ Khaled himself and his closest friends. This Air Jordan 3 comes dressed in a Red leather upper with elephant print overlays completed with “We The Best” on the heels. The Air Jordan 3 Red by DJ Khaled is highlighted with Red tumbled leather throughout the uppers while the traditional perforations land on the tongue. Following we have elephant print which wraps the toe and heel. The Jumpman branding is done in White while Black accents are seen on the midsole and bottom eyelets. On the heel we have ‘WE THE BEST’ while on the inside of the heel tab reads #GREATFUL, #WeTheBest, and #stillinthemeeting. the Air Jordan 3 “Black Cement” released was back in 2011, which didn’t included Nike Air branding. This 2018 Retro marks the first time it will be retroed with its original branding since 2001. Dressed in a Black, Cement Grey, White and Fire Red color scheme. This Air Jordan 3 comes complete with classic Nike Air branding at the heel and outsole, along with Fire Red tongue lining, a signature seen on the colorway to complete the legendary look for the “Black Cement” 3s. The Air Jordan 3 Black Cement is officially set to release on Michael Jordan’s birthday, February 17th during NBA All-Star Weekend. Even though DJ Khaled’s Air Jordan 3 never released to the public, if you had an opportunity to purchase either pair, which would it be?
  5. The Air Jordan 3 “Black Cement” is a black and grey version of Michael Jordan’s third signature shoe. It originally released in 1988, followed by 1994, 2001, 2018, and 2011 featuring a mix of leather, elephant print, and visible Air. The shoe releases again with Remastered OG “Nike Air” branding on Michael Jordan’s birthday, February 17th, 2018 for $200 in celebration of the sneaker’s 30th Anniversary. Read the articles below for further release details and price information. We are 22 November 2011 and today is the big day out of the Air Jordan 3 Black Cement, one of the most sneakers known and recognized. We were also often asked if this 2011 version was competitive with the retro of 2018, after the pack CDP 3/20 (the latter being more easily found and ‘affordable’). So we are often told that over the years the retro lose enormously in quality, 2018jordans.com helps us to take stock of this release and therefore whether it is better to let go a few dollars more on the 2018 or 2011 proccurer this version. SneakersAddict present you, in French, this roundup. So sit back, relax and enjoy! Like many recent retros, we note that the colors are not met (we think of the gray cement IV white / cement). The III Black / Cement is no exception, we note a varsity red darker than the 2018 that it was very close to OG version. This notable are on the inner cover of the sneaker, of the tongue and Jumpman. This is unfortunate, but the difference is not so obvious is true condition (in real life, on your feet). Regarding the placement of the label, the 2011 (left) is more consistent with the range by putting Jordan on the inside of the tongue, unlike the 2018 version that hides in the inner side of the sneaker. To counterbalance the darker red varstity of 2011, Jordan Brand to put an Elephant print in black slightly less intense. But this was done out of concern for color balance and does not jump in the eyes. For insole .The 2018 version was released for the 23 th anniversary of Jordan 3 sneakers, so she has a special insole far enough from the OG. The 2011 version is much more simple and standard. For the silhouette .The 2011 version (like the white cement and true blue) sees her figure slightly redesigned with a slightly larger overall appearance and a tongue that dates back earlier than 2008, it is also slightly wider. And on the tongue, it’s not a bad thing, given that Jordan is doing with the tab visible. For the padding of the tongue.Here you will find that the tongue is much more padded on the 2018 version (2nd image) than the 2011 version. Jordan Brand explained to us at the exit of the white Cement 2011 that this change gave more freedom to move the anchor to those who would wear during a game of basketball For the Conclusion.This 2011 version has against it a slightly darker red varsity, a slightly more massive. For the rest there is no real difference strong enough to justify the extra Euros required for CDP 2018 Jordans version. Jordan Brand has done a great job on this 2011, then go ahead darken, it is on sale now in all good dairies advised to take € 155. Another big thank you for this great comparative 2018jordans.com and these wonderful pictures
  6. The Nike Hyperdunk 2017 is the ninth Nike Hyperdunk model. It is a high-performance basketball shoe that features a slip-on construction with a mix of either Flyknit or mesh textile over REACT foam cushioning. Currently,Hyperudnk 2017 BLK EP is released For the box , it is normal as usually For the material : Nike Hyperdunk 2017 features with mesh material which lightweight, breathable.Nike has highlighted this by using contrasting colors for the base layer, which you can see here in black. on one hand, it reinforces the mesh upper and provides greater durability. On the other hand, it limits the amount of airflow that mesh traditionally brings. that is great anyway . For the cushioning : While React may be Nike’s most resilient foam cushion as last version . though it is just so so for the cushioning . hope that it is will be better in next version . As my experience with React, There will be no loss in mobility or a feeling of sinking into mushy cushion.And the court feeling is not good . I would not prefer this type of feeling. If you prefer a springy cushion then there are plenty of options that will give you that feeling,such as the Jordan series of shoes . React just isn’t the best option for you . here are the lacy system picture , It is great that can lockdown the feet very well For the supporting : Actuallly the supporting is not too bad . A TPU torsional plate are all in place and all of piece do their jobs and keep your foot on the footbed, ensuring you aren’t straining your foot. that is great for this one .the most important is Hyperdunk 2017 Reviews and they offer a wide stable platform without feeling clunky or restrictive. so maybe it is the reason why I choose it . For the traction : Nike Hyperdunk 2017 Mid Black Red The rubber traction just so so , and that court was so bad that everyone in the gym was slipping. but the grip is great in the clean court . Overall , materials, fit, and support are all standout features. However, the traction just so so that can not meet my required . And Nike really needs to work on React cushion or ditch the foam entirely.what do you think ?
  7. Jordan Brand will be celebrating Chinese New Year with the Air Jordan 6 CNY for January 2018.The Chinese New Year also known as the Spring Festival is one of the biggest event celebrated in China. The festival lasts for about 23 days, ending on the 15th day of the first lunar month in the following year in the Chinese calendar. During the festival, houses are clean spotless, red posters with poetic verses are put on doors, red lanterns adorn many people’s homes. It’s also a time where many people visit their relatives. The climax comes in the evening of Spring Festival Eve where people set off fireworks and firecrackers to cast away bad luck and attract good luck. Today ,we got one . Air Jordan 6 CNY Reviews-For the box, it is simply and there are the details for the side For the material : you can kind of recognize all the elements of the Festival on it, the most notable one being the fireworks and firecrackers in the upper . that is might not be the finished product and the mesh material of the upper , the breathability is great , I can feel the air through the shoe . For the supporting:the special design of the firework Embroidery and the material offer the great supporting if you want some material support and flexibility along the upper then this type of setup would work as far as materials are concerned. it the best one that you choose For the traction : air jordan 6 used the a specific traction pattern that followed the last versionif kept clean they are actually very good at keeping your foot planted on the floor no matter what you were doing,Personally I use a traction mat but you can easily bring a lint roller or a roll of duct tape with you to quickly remove debris from the sole.that is great. For the cushioning,it has been with the Air Jordan design , The cushioning is dense and it has been did perfect job.air jordans plenty to choose from and can be catered to your specific needs Overall , It’s a shoe that offers many great attributes while falling short on others and the special firework Embroidery provide the holiday joy for tradition Chinese spring. Don't miss it
  8. Traction on the Kyrie 4 is comprised of multi-directional herringbone — a favorite of mine. I love when traction patterns are aggressive yet traditional; this one mixes a little bit of the old with a little bit of the new. This type of coverage worked really well on a variety of courts and conditions. Although the outsoles started off a bit slick the first couple of nights — I think there’s some residue on the soles to start — they consistently got better with each wear. That made wiping the outsoles something that wasn’t required very often. I still feel that the the past two Kyrie models offered a bit more bite than the Kyrie 4, but I don’t think that that’s a bad thing. This traction pattern worked really nicely without feeling like you could break your own ankles at a moment’s notice. Cushion is the best it’s ever been in any Kyrie model with the Kyrie 4. The heel still features a Zoom Air unit, that I felt was unnecessary for the most part as I tend to stay off my heels. However, if you happen to use your heel then coverage from the Zoom unit is there. What I loved about the shoe is that the design team brought Cushlon back into the fold — something that I’ve been waiting on for a very long time. Not only is Cushlon used, but it makes up the entire midsole. Usually Cushlon is implemented with a Phylon carrier to the softer/bouncier foam mixture, but not this time around. The midsole is still on the thin side (at the forefoot) so the bounce-back that Cushlon usually offers is minimized, but much like adidas’ Bounce, this setup proved to be a well balanced offering of cushioning and court feel. If Cushlon is used on the Kyrie line from here on out then the line may go from being one of my least anticipated models of the year to one of my most anticipated models. Like the outsole, the materials along the upper are a mix of the old and new. Engineered mesh is featured at the forefoot and that provides you with a lightweight material that requires hardly any break-in time. Nylon is glued to the underside which restricts all of the air flow, but in turn it strengthens the material. Meanwhile, the heel panel is a suede material that, while not premium, doesn’t feel cheap at all. In fact, it only makes me scratch my head at the materials used on the Kobe AD Mid even more than I already had. For $120, the Kyrie 4 feels like it could’ve been priced at the Kobe AD Mid’s $150 (I’m glad it wasn’t though). Prices on these shoes are still ridiculous even with basketball market sales dropping over the past couple of years. Having some of the best performers of the year being priced under $150 is great for consumers and a head scratching moment for brands because some of the $150 and up models are not as well rounded. I suppose it can be compared a bit to the movie industry. Films with smaller budgets tend to have greater impact and story telling even though they have to stretch a limited budget. That forces creatives to be, well, creative. Nowadays, the films with massive budgets often are lackluster and filled with eye candy but not much payoff. Durability of the rear panel has been great thus far and the durability of the mesh should be okay with the nylon glued to it. Without it I think it’d likely rip over time time as it had on the Kobe 8 after extensive use. The shoe fits snug but true to size. Wide footers may want to consider going up 1/2 size. If you’ve worn any of the past Kyrie models, I’d highly recommend you stick with the same size you wore comfortably in those because they feel like they’re all built on the same last. Lockdown was solid up and down. The lacing is traditional so there’s little room for error there. As stated above, the forefoot is snug, which is something I personally enjoy. I always felt secure in the shoe and never felt my foot sliding around at any time — much like my experiences in the Kyrie 1-3. Support on the Kyrie 4 was something I had no issues with. The midsole doesn’t cradle you in the way that I personally prefer (like a Dame 4 or Curry 4) but the rubber outsole’s exaggerated “teeth” offer a similar feel. The teeth wrap up and around the forefoot to stabilize the Cushlon a bit while also slightly caging the forefoot. You can’t see it, but the Kyrie 4 has an internal heel counter at the rear. It isn’t quite as strong as something like external TPU or carbon fiber, but it more than gets the job done and ensures your heel remains atop the footbed without sliding over. There isn’t a traditional outrigger in place, but the midsole up front is wide and sits low. The way it’s sculpted also acts as like an outrigger, which is a huge bonus. Overall, the Nike Kyrie 4 is Nike’s best performer this year. Its very well-rounded on all fronts in a way that makes the Kyrie 4 more like a nike lebron 15. There’s just enough cushion for most, solid traction, fantastic fit and adequate support — and all of comes at a “team” friendly price point of $120. I’m not a huge fan of the Kyrie line overall but if this is the direction Nike plans on going with the line then may change. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve loved aspects of the past models, especially the traction, but the brick-like Phylon has been anything but forgiving. Even the Curry 4’s foam midsole is more forgiving than the Phylon used on past Kyries, so the return of Cushlon was a great choice to bring a bit more balance to the low profile tooling. I don’t believe I’ve said this all year, because it hadn’t been deserved, but great job Nike Basketball. This is the kind of shoe that I’ve been waiting for all year.
  9. The Under Armour Curry 4 Low has landed and we’ve put it through its paces. Herringbone is missing from the Curry line for the very first time, and while we love our herringbone, it wasn’t actually missed. The spiral pattern used offers multi-directional coverage for any move performed at any time. Linear coverage is fantastic and lateral coverage is handled very well too. The tackiness of the rubber compound used (on translucent outsole options) attracts dust like a magnet. Wiping will be very necessary if you play on a poorly maintained court, but when you’re not wiping you’ll still be able to stick until you have the time to clear things out. (One of the courts I play on feels slick even after its been cleaned — it likely needs to be refinished — and the Curry 4 Low was still able to hold its own there.) With the translucent rubber playing so well on some terrible courts it makes me wonder how much more awesome solid rubber versions of the outsole will perform. If you aren’t using herringbone, use this, because this was awesome. Tech specs for the air jordan 11 cny and Curry 4 Low have been vague. All that we have been told is that UA is incorporating a proprietary foam compound for responsiveness underfoot. Whether or not this foam is Charged, a new form of Micro G, or something else entirely is still up in the air. However, I do know how the cushion felt underfoot and the best word I can use to describe it is minimal. Not quite Kyrie minimal, but minimal enough to allow for court feel and some minor impact protection. You can always swap out the insole for some additional coverage (I was fine with the stock insole) but this isn’t the shoe for people that need cushioning. Much like the Curry models of the past, these are all about control, court feel, and stability. If those are attributes you require out of your shoes then you’re going to love how these play. Again, if you’re looking for something with a ton of cushion then these simply weren’t meant for you. What I like most about the midsole tooling used on the Curry 4 Low is that it offers a minimal setup and the shoe owns it. The Curry 3 was super firm and thick for no reason. You rode high off the floor without the benefit of having a well-cushioned ride. That wound up making the 3 feel heavy and clunky underfoot. It was stable, but you can achieve greater stability by bringing yourself down to the floor; that will make you feel lighter on your feet and quicker. This was not the case with the Curry 4 Low because what you see is what you get. I feel the perfect setup for these would have been this exact midsole setup with the addition of a Micro G insole; luckily, I still have a few of those stashed away from older UA models. That combination gives you a little more feedback from the foam insole while retaining all of the attributes the Curry 4 Low Red For Sale The materials are the only real change between the Curry 4 Low and high. The high featured a knit lacing area and collar while the rest of the shoe was welded to a synthetic. This time around we have two components to the upper: the inner structure and the outer layers. Some may be happy to know that one of the outer layers is a true knit that is very stretchy and form fitting. A synthetic overlay is in place over the knit for the second layer which is overlayed at the toe and portions of the midfoot. However, this synthetic is very thin and more of a skin layer used to protect the knit and prevent the upper from stretching too much. Under the knit is the shoe itself. To my surprise, there’s nearly half of a shoe under there which is something I found interesting. From the lacing all the way to the collar is a fuse-like material with mesh glued on top of it. That’s really what’s doing all the heavy lifting in terms of containing the foot (along with the midsole tooling) while the outer knit layer is mostly there for comfort and to ensure the shoe looks like a shoe. All of these components worked well with one another and have been fairly durable so far. Although, they show signs of wear and tear almost instantly. The Curry 4 Low runs very snug. It’s high top counterpart ran true to size, but the interior featured no padding. The Low is a bit different and has an ankle pillow in the rear. This pillow is a bit dense and pushes the foot up enough to make you wonder if you bought the right size. Luckily, the Curry 4 Low breaks in rather quickly but will remain snug at all times. Given how soft some of the upper is, along with it being generously low cut, the Curry 4 Low ensures your foot and the shoe are practically one and the same. However, I do believe there will be many that will feel the need to go up 1/2 size. If you’re wearing the shoe casually then that what I would do. For those wishing to play in them, let me know in the comments if you end up going up 1/2 size. Being that the Curry 4 Low fits as tight as it does I’m very curious to know how the shoe fits different people. Despite being a minimal shoe, and an extremely low-cut low top on top of that, the support is solid. The overall support doesn’t rely heavily on the upper, other than the fit, but more so on the way everything works together. The way your foot rests inside the shoe, the way the midsole is sculpted in the rear and lateral forefoot — all of it works very well together and everything feels very anatomical correct. If I were to enhance anything it would have been the internal heel counter. I would have liked it to be a little bigger and cover more area. The way it’s implemented currently wasn’t a deal breaker because I love playing in the shoe, but it’s the one thing I feel could have been improved upon. Otherwise, the way the outsole sits on the floor, moves with the upper, and moves with the wearer’s foot feels effortless. The Under Armour Curry 4 Low is a very good performance model, much like its high top counterpart. I’d normally say how much I prefer the low top version of *insert shoe name here* but this time around I actually prefer the high top. The materials are something I feel should have been featured on the high top, but the fit is something that I found to be a bit more comfortable in the original version of the shoe. This is mainly due to the heel pillow. My right shoe broke in nicely but the left shoe hasn’t quite given me the same experience. If you like your newjordans2018.com to be snug, and I mean really snug, then you’ll probably have nothing but love for the Curry 4 Low. This is great traction and stability for low-to-the-ground guards that prefers to be quick on their feet.
  10. Like the Air Jordan 1 Flyknit ‘BHM’, Nike is putting a special multicolor touch on two of its signature lines for Black History Month. Nike is beefing up its Black History Month theme of black, red, and green (and a touch of gold) with two new colorways of the LeBron 15 and KD 10. The sneakers and are rumored to be releasing in just a few days on January 15, which of course does not fall within Black History Month but is fitting nonetheless because it’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The LeBron 15 ‘BHM’ features a Battleknit upper that weaves together red, green, and black. Underneath, everything from the heel counter, Zoom cushioning, and outsole is blacked out with one small exception (we’ll get to that later). Unfortunately, there were no premium touches given to the lacing and pull tabs that we can see — and no, these do not appear to carry those special outriggers we were hoping to see on retail units. The KD 10 takes a different approach by using a black Flyknit base and adding red and green via the TPU reinforcements. It is overlayed with leather accents at the eyestays while black Swooshes are outlined with a nice gold touch. The midsole is predominately treated with white, but adds some color blocking towards the heel to fit in with the ‘BHM’ scheme atop visible Zoom and a solid white rubber outsole. We are sure you noticed those gold dates featured on both silhouettes. These represent some special moments were both LeBron and KD took to the stage respectively. The July 13, 2016, date on the LeBron 15 refers to the ESPY Awards of 2016 where LeBron joined his friends/fellow athletes Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony, and Chris Paul to create a profound moment with their statements. The KD 10 BHM date of May 6, 2014, honors the crowning of Kevin Durant as the NBA’s Most Valuable Player. He gave a touching speech that seemed to highlight everyone on earth but himself (who could forget that touching moment he shared with his mother?). There’s no official word yet on pricing or availability for these two pairs, but check back for updates as we will be sure to provide more information as it comes. What do you think of the way Nike’s 2018 BHM Collection is shaping up? Which of the two shoes pictured here was executed better? Let us know in the comments below.
  11. The adidas Yeezy 350 Boost is designed by Kanye West and is a low-top sneaker. Originally releasing back in February 2015, the model has released in various colorways. 1.adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Sesame Release Date The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ‘Sesame’ will be one of a few releases during Summer 2018 which will accompany the ‘Ice Yellow’ edition. Looking closer you can see that this adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 comes dressed in Sesame. The shade which looks like Light Khaki covers the Primeknit uppers while landing on the encapsulated Boost midsole. Finishing the look we have Gum on the outsole. The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Sesame will release at select adidas Originals retailers and online at adidas.com during August 2018. Retail price is set at $220. Once additional information is available we will make sure to update you. 2.adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Ice Yellow Release Date The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ‘Ice Yellow’ is one of a few releases from Kanye West and the Three Stripes brand part of the Summer 2018 lineup. For this pair of adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 they come completely dressed in Ice Yellow. In addition they feature matching tonal laces while the same shade lands on the back heel pull tab and rubber midsole which covers the Boost. The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Ice Yellow will release at select adidas Originals retailers including online at adidas.com during June 2018. Retail price is set at $220. Once additional information is available we will make sure to update you. Below you can check out another image which will give you a closer look. 2018/1/5 Update about Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 Release Date Jordan Brand has unveiled Russell Westbrook’s first on-court signature shoe known as the Jordan Why Not Zer0.1. Westbrook will wear the ‘Mirror Image’ PE tonight as the Thunder take on the Lakers at Staples Center. The Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 is crafted for the dynamic game and personality of the reigning MVP and fashion king while featuring a fused mesh upper, smooth vamp cover, full length Zoom Air unit and compression molded pylon foam piece engineered for flight. Russ’s on-court debut is a PE version of the “Mirror Image” colorway, a style that displays his desire to tell personal stories through colorways. Each shoe uses cut out images to represent Michael Jordan (left) and Russell Westbrook (right). The Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 ‘Mirror Image’ will first release in limited numbers on January 15th. Following is the release of the ‘2-Way’ edition which will take place on February 15th. more an mor on newjordans2018.com
  12. Concord 11s and Game Royal 1s Are Returning In 2018 1."Concord" Air Jordan 11 retail 2018 at $220. following initial rumblings a few months back, the fan favorite "Concord" Air Jordan 11 looks like it is going to be one of next year's annual holiday releases. According to leakers such as soleheatonfeet, the "Concord" 11 will make its return around October or November 2018. Expect this classic black and white colorway of MJ's eleventh signature model to feature a remastered construction with a higher cut of patent leather like has been seen on other recent Retro 11 releases. Other possibilities for this release could be a swap of the "23" on the back heel for a "45" to match Jordan's 1995 PE a detail that would certainly be welcomed by Jordan Brand fanatics. No official word on pricing as of yet, but expect the new jordans 2018 "Concord" Air Jordan 11 to retail at $220. Note: The pair pictured is the retro release from 2011, not the upcoming 2018 pair. 2.Air Jordan 1 Retro High OG "Game Royal" Older sneakerheads may remember this upcoming colorway of the Air Jordan 1 Retro from a questionable "sample" photo that used to make rounds on forums like ISS and basketball shoes . The colorway will soon become the real deal, with an expected early-2018 launch on the horizon. Essentially a blue-based "Chicago" colorway, retro sports a palette of Game Royal, white and black. OG designation is there, meaning Nike Air branding will be featured on the tongue. The "Game Royal" Jordan 1 will release in Feb. 2018 for $160. Keep it locked for and more no newjordans2018.com
  13. After weeks of testing, the Nike LeBron 15 Ashes Performance Review is here. Traction was solid for the most part. You can feel the triangle pattern bite and grip the court really well from a linear standpoint. Unfortunately, laterally I can’t say the same. The way the pattern is implemented seems to be straight across the surface. If some portions of the pattern were turned a bit I feel lateral coverage would’ve had that same bite that it offers linearly. While I did play in a pair (for a very short time) that featured clear soles, the court I had played on was one of the most pristine surfaces I’ve had the pleasure of encountering. To be safe, rather than sorry, I’d opt for solid rubber. I know there are some killer colorways releasing that use translucent rubber that will be more enticing than some of the offerings that use solid rubber, but (there’s always a but) just keep in mind that if my pair with solid rubber didn’t offer as much bite laterally as it could have, imagine what it’d be like on a “normal” surface and the translucent rubber outsole. I would not recommend playing in the LeBron 15 Ashes outdoors. Exposed Air units almost always pop once the outsole grinds down to the cushion’s surface and the rubber used here is soft, so it’ll likely happen sooner rather than later. Beast mode! If you’re a cushion-above-all-else type of player then you’ll love these. The bounce and feedback felt from the Zoom units is incredible. This isn’t the first time this type of cushion has been utilized in a LeBron model (the last time was the LeBron 10) but articulation is present this time around so overall mobility has greatly increased. Is the setup perfect? While it’s as close as it’s ever been, it still has some issues. Lateral stability — while a bit better than the LBJ10 due to wrapping the front portion of the Air unit in Phylon — could benefit from the implementation of an actual outrigger. I’m not sure why there isn’t a true outrigger on a shoe that rides on a platform made of Air, but that’s what we’ve got to work with here. If you’re a linear player, like LeBron, then you shouldn’t have many issues with stability and support. However, if you move laterally often then you’ll likely feel the instability and it’ll hinder your on court performance. It caused me to hesitate instead of moving as I normally would around the court. I believe the tooling could be the cause of LeBron’s recent ankle issues. While he usually sprints from one end of the floor to the other, there are times when he’ll move laterally. The tippy nature of the LeBron 15s tooling will be loud and clear when someone moves laterally in them — and you can see LeBron’s body jerk a bit to recover. A wider setup or a larger outrigger could likely resolve the issues I’ve been experiencing. I hope we see something on the LeBron 16 that adds lateral stability while retaining all of the awesomeness that is Max Zoom Air. Battleknit is used here (aka really thick Flyknit) and it feels awesome on-foot. If you were unimpressed with the stiff upper used on the new jordans 2018 and the cheap but soft materials used on the LeBron 14, you may find that the material choice on the LeBron 15 Ashes offers a happy balance between the two. Some areas of the knit are thicker than others while high wear areas are glued a bit for durability. Once on-foot I felt comfortable and secure, and if you’ve worn Flyknit hoop shoes before you’ll feel the evolution throughout the years. I went down half size from my true size in the LeBron 15 Ashes due to the materials and build of the upper. One piece uppers can be tricky to get just right and I’d rather have them be a little snug than a bit too loose — especially with the tooling setup the way it is. Trying them on in-store is the best option, and make sure to bring your brace or orthotics with you to ensure everything works. Lockdown was surprisingly nice from heel to toe. While the lacing structure relies solely on Flywire, it did its job rather well. The top “eyelet” or Flywire cable draws the heel into the rear section of the shoe nicely while additional heel padding takes care of the rest. Once you’re in the LeBron 15 and laced up, especially if you opt for going down half size, you’ll be locked in and ready to go. Support in the LeBron 15 is a bit lackluster due to the tooling setup. Traditional support features like a torsional midfoot shank and TPU heel counter are all in place and work well. Hwoever, the midsole and outsole lack a wide enough base and it really hurt the lateral stability and overall support. Again, if you’re a linear player then you should be fine. If you move around laterally then you may have the same experience I had in them. I love pieces of the LeBron 15 Ashes . Materials and fit are highlights, and the cushion is the best Nike has offered in years. Stability made them a bit concerning for me while on the floor and I never ended up feeling as comfortable as I wanted to be. If you’re willing to sacrifice lateral stability in lieu of cushion then you’ll enjoy the LeBron 15 Ashes immensely. If you’re a low profile player that roams the floor and curls off screens to get an open look at the basket then you may want something a bit different go to newjordans2018.com
  14. traction – I’ll admit I was disappointed with the traction at first. It just wasn’t as awesome as I remembered it being with the Original and first round Retro releases. However, if you stick with it… the traction will break-in and give you plenty of coverage on the court. Lateral movements and front to back coverage are plentiful yet offer little restriction with movements – thanks to the much lower profile as opposed to the Air Jordan 13 After nearly a week’s worth of playing, the traction was just as I remembered it being back in the day. Cushion – Heel and forefoot Zoom Air cushion. It’s responsive, resilient and comfortable. No, it’s not quite as springy as the Air Jordan XII but as I mentioned above, you have much better court feel with the lower profile so you can pretty much have whatever ride you see fit – between the AJ XII and XIII. On a personal level, I liked the feeling of the XII more but the lower profile ride of the XIII… I can’t have everything. Material – The materials aren’t too great but they could be worse. At least the PU coated leather breaks in nicely – more than I can say for other models like the 2018 he got game air jordan 13 . My main gripe with PU coated leather is that the coat can be unpredictable. At times its durable as hell while other times it peels away from the leather as its bond to the glue is much stronger than the bond to the split grain leather. The overall durability is still there it’s just that you will have sections that look like sole separation – which this isn’t… trust me, I know the difference. You can play in these like this just fine as I have been but it’s disappointing to see more than anything. If you choose to play in the most recent releases then this shouldn’t happen as those have slightly better quality. Fit – These fit true to size while the most recent feel like they have a lot of dead space in the toe. Anything released from 2012 to the present time I would go ½ size down for a snug fit. If you wish to remain with your regular size and you feel that there is too much space, just put an additional insole in the shoe and you should be fine. Lockdown is awesome, plain and simple. After a short break-in period the leather will soften up a bit. Once you readjust your laces then your foot won’t be going anywhere. Ventilation – There isn’t any… I actually had sweat bleeding through to the red suede some nights. Doesn’t bother me at all but those who require well ventilated shoes… you won’t find it here. Support – Overall support is great. The Carbon Fiber adds torsional support and minor arch support – those with high arches usually will require the use of orthotic inserts. The fit its great and provides plenty of support and the base is nice and wide which does take some getting used to but once you adjust, you’ll be busting moves with more confidence than before. Overall – 15 years later and these are just as fierce on the court as they were before. The Air Jordan XII and XIII are forces to be reckoned with on-court. There are some minor setbacks in terms of material quality but for the most part I think these still performed just as good as some of today’s sneakers. The Way of Wade played pretty similar when I think about it… and I really liked those on newjordans2018.com
  15. Where have the adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 For fans of the adidas Yeezy 350 for sale, this Holiday season we have a large lineup set to take place. A total of three will launch known as the ‘Beluga 2.0’, ‘Blue Tint’ and ’Semi Frozen Yellow’. Looks like adidas will be changing around the months on these releases according to Yeezy Mafia. The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ‘Beluga 2.0’ will now release during December, the adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ’Semi Frozen Yellow’ will now release during November, the adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ‘Blue Tint’ will still release during December. During October, something new will release instead of the ‘Beluga 2.0’. The adidas Yeezy PowePhase in ‘Black’ and ‘Grey’ will release either late December or early January. Once we have more information, we will make sure to update you. It’s possible that the ‘Red Night’ colorway will debut during October. 1.adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ’Semi Frozen Yellow’ The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ’Semi Frozen Yellow’ is another Yeezy Boost 350 V2 that will release during November 2017. The brand new colorway is one of two releasing for the Holiday season. Although images have yet to leak of this upcoming adidas Yeezy 350 Boost V2, they will feature a Semi Frozen Yellow, Raw Steel and Red color combination. What you can expect is Primeknit used across the uppers along with Boost technology. The outsole is said to feature Gum. The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Semi Frozen Yellow will release at select adidas Originals retailers on November 18th, 2017. 2.adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Blue Tint The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ‘Blue Tint’ is releasing for the Holiday 2017 season. Combing new colors for December, they are expected to be one of the last Yeezy 350 Boost V2 releases of the year. While we wait for a first look, here we have a mockup of what this adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 will look like. Featuring a Blue Tint, Grey Three and High Resolution Red color combination. Featuring a Grey Primeknit upper, we have accents of an Icy Blue while Red lands on the SPLY-350. The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Blue Tint is scheduled to release at select adidas Originals retailers on December 1st, 2017. Retail price will be $220. 3. adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ‘Beluga 2.0’ adidas Originals will debut another Yeezy Boost 350 V2 which appears will be a follow up to the first release, the ‘Beluga’. Showcased is the adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 ‘Bold Orange’ that will launch during November 2017. This adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 comes dressed in a Grey, Bold Orange and Dark Grey color theme. While we wait on images to officially surface, a rendering has landed which makes them look very similar to the ‘Beluga’. Some of the biggest differences are the use of Bold Orange accents in the addition of a heel pull tab. The adidas Yeezy Boost 350 V2 Bold Orange is scheduled to release at select adidas Originals retailers on November 25th, 2017. now, go to newestyeezy.com store buy one .
  16. Three Style Newest Nike PG 1 release date and reviews Since his late-2015 return to the court, George has steadily returned to the form he lost in his injury and proven himself worthy of a signature model as the Pacers fight for a playoff spot. His future as a Pacer, however, is uncertain. George’s contract was heavily rumored to be moved at the 2017 trade deadline, and speculation remains that he will be suiting up for a new team following his impending free agency. 1.Nike PG 1 UConn PE Release Date Nike Basketball has recently given the Connecticut Huskies men’s basketball team their own Nike PG 1 UConn PE which they will wear for their season opener which takes place this Friday, November 10th. Looking closer they feature the schools team colors. As you can see this Nike PG 1 for sale features White across the uppers while National Flag Blue is applied to the tongue, Nike Swoosh and midsole. Other highlights includes Connecticut’s Huskies’ logo on the heels while White covers the outsole which completes the look. Don’t expect the Nike PG 1 UConn PE to release, however we will continue to showcase upcoming colorways and models created for team. Below you can check out more images which will give you a better look. Let us know your thoughts in the comments section belo. Aaaa. The month of November will bring us a couple Nike PG 1 releases. The latest to showcase features a Black and University Gold theme. 2.Nike PG 1 Black University Gold Release Date Being specific, this Nike PG 1 comes dressed in a Black, University Gold and Wolf Grey color combination. Across the base we have Black while using suede and mesh. Following we have Gold accents which outlines the Nike Swoosh, hits the PG branding, heel and other select areas. Finishing the look is a Grey midsole with speckled detailing. The Nike PG 1 Black University Gold is scheduled to release at select Nike Basketball retailers including online at Nike.com on November 18th, 2017. Retail price will be $110. 3.Nike PG 1 Duke PE Release Date Recently we showcased the Nike PG 1 Duke PE which was gifted to the school. Nike Basketball will also extend upon their player exclusives for the regular season opener. We now have a look at the Nike PG 1 ‘Kentucky Wildcats’ PE. As you can see this Nike PG 1 comes covered in Royal Blue while White accents are spread throughout. In addition we have speckled detailing on the midsole while White is applied to the outsole. Completing the look and making them officially a player exclusive, we have the schools logo on the heel. Continue to scroll below to check out another image of the Nike PG 1 Kentucky Wildcats PE. Don’t expect this pair to release however its possible to see some sizes wind up on new jordans 2018. Make sure to visit the comments section and let us know your thoughts. Nike PG 1 Reviews That means that by the time the Nike PG2 drops next year it may be launching in purple and yellow. But before we get ahead of ourselves though, it’s time find out if the first model in the series carries on the tradition of fantastic affordable signature models from Nike. Hover over the dots for a breakdown of how the Nike PG1 performs on-court. Traction – The Nike PG 1 features an interesting pattern that will serve you well on-court. This particular version of the shoe features translucent rubber, and while it’s better than what Nike Basketball has put out in the past, it still isn’t the best option. Why does Nike insist on using clear rubber? It’s mostly to showcase the technology within the shoe. However, upcoming colorways of the PG1 feature solid rubber — what I’d recommend over the translucent options — while highlighting the cushion within the midsole by changing the color of the rubber in that particular section. I believe that is the best route and I’m surprised Nike hasn’t done it sooner with so many complaints about the lack of tackiness its translucent rubber offers. The good news is that the pattern here really helps the rubber compound out and dust doesn’t stick to the pattern much. A quick wipe every so often will do the outsole good, and I’m almost positive that the solid rubber options will far exceed this version on-court. Cushion – Forefoot bottom loaded Zoom Air is what is offered in the PG1. This setup is for those that want a more responsive ride for greater reaction speed. You won’t sink into the cushion and you won’t feel it bounce back as you would if it were directly underfoot, but it gets the job done for the most part. At the heel it’s just Phylon so nothing special there. Some may feel the setup is a bit lackluster if they’re expecting an abundant amount of cushion, but if you are more into court feel then this will prove to be a worthy setup. Materials – This is one of the best material options we’ve had from Nike Basketball Shoes in a long time. It offers a little bit of everything, but not in a way that would make the shoe feel awkward or cluttered with tons of gimmicky materials. The forefoot is free feeling with the open mesh and it’s protected by a layer of fuse in the high wear areas. This is great for players that stay on their toes and do not enjoy breaking in shoes. Meanwhile, the rear panel, on this colorway, is made of nubuck and it feels like the good ‘ol days when nubucks and leathers were being used to construct a sneaker. The overall build feels good, looks good, and plays well. Can’t really ask for much more than that. Materials and fit on the Nike PG 1 are my favorite aspects of the sneaker. Speaking of fit… Fit – The PG 1 fits true to size. However, they are very snug — just the way I like it. The overall fit reminds me a bit of the Nike Kryie 3 White Green — one of the best fitting shoes I’ve ever worn — especially at the forefoot. And that’s before I even adjusted the strap. If you’re a wide footer then you may want to go up 1/2 size as the one-piece construction doesn’t offer much stretch once they’re on your foot. The PG1 isn’t perfect, but Nike deserves any success that comes with Paul George’s first signature model because the shoe is that good. It’s a great aesthetic design, is releasing in attractive colorways, and—most importantly—performs on a level that far exceeds its relatively low price tag. For $110, it’s hard to go wrong. Its cushioning and stability are top-notch, making it my favorite Nike of the season at any price.
  17. One of my favorite basketball shoes of 2017 is the Dame 4. It took the attributes that worked really well from the Dame 2 and 3 and carried them over to the 4 while reducing the bulk. It shows the lines refinement and fluid transition from one model to the next. Evolution, baby. Evolution! As mentioned in the Dame 4 performance review, the Bounce midsole felt lower than any of the previous iterations — which you can see here. You still ride inside of the midsole, but the bulk has been trimmed down. So, you receive support and containment from the midsole in key areas rather than the entire thing. That’s what made the midsole of the Dame 3 look so chunky; practically the entire top line rode above your foot wheres in the Dame 4 it’s much more precise. Cheap insole — standard adidas practice nowadays. If you ask those that have been wearing adidas models for the past 10 years what aspect the shoes have declined in it would be the insole. Yes, you can swap the insole out for your own — which is recommended to maximize comfort and fit — but the Three Stripes used to provide thick PU insoles that were heavenly. I can only imagine the comfort Bounce would offer coupled with those old PU insoles. Maybe we’ll get an insole upgrade from adidas eventually. For the time being, the standard insole wasn’t horrible, but it’s cheap and sticks out as the glaring overlooked item in an otherwise perfect package. Strobel board, standard in all footwear. Some shoes add an additional foam layer for extra comfort, something the Dame 4 could have used with the slimmed down and firmed up Bounce. Not a deal breaker by any means, just something to note. The torsional plate is interesting. I just reviewed a runner from Asics that featured a beefed up version of this. If you missed that video you can catch it here. I had wondered how something like what Asics offered would feel on-court, and while this is a much smaller version, it’s still fairly similar and offered ample torsional support. The forefoot is very thin. Bounce offered just enough cushion to make this a well balanced ride between court feel and protection. Meanwhile, the heel rides a bit higher. You can feel more of the bounce that Bounce offers here mostly due to its thickness and the holes placed throughout. These holes allow your weight and pressure to force the compression of the midsole more than it would without them. While you “squish” the foam down it’ll expand into the cored out sections and then bounce back. (This is what Nike should have done with React. It would have made that cushion setup much more forgiving.) This is a great shot of the Dame 3 and Dame 4 side by side. You can see the top layer of Bounce foam in the Dame 3 (above) that sits inside of the EVA midsole carrier. This makes me wonder if the Dame 4 midsole is completely Bounce or if Bounce was removed altogether — which I doubt — but it’s never out of the realm of possibilities. I think if adidas was caught removing tech from any of the lineup it has right now it could kill the momentum so, again, I doubt that’s what it did. It’s more likely that adidas firmed Bounce up and made it the entire midsole — which is how the shoe felt while playing in them. Here are the layers of the upper. This is a cool image that shows you each component within the upper. The main structure is the exterior layer while the middle lining and third layer of padding protect your foot from the more structured material. This view allows you to see what your foot sees. If it had eyes, of course. In between the structured outer layer and padded interior are the lace cables, much like Nike’s Flywire — except these cables were much stronger. I had wondered if the heel tab was connected to one of the lace cables when I first grabbed the Dame 4 but I couldn’t tighten any of the laces tight enough to move the pull tab. It’s nice to see that they are in fact connected. I just couldn’t notice a difference once on-foot. This is the outsole. Nothing to see here, other than it looks really cool with all those teeth at the heel. It’s very thin as well so wearing for outdoor hooping is something that you’ll do at your own risk while knowing it won’t be the most durable. That takes care of the breakdown on the adidas Dame 4 deconstruction. Another great job by the folks over at FastPass and it’s always awesome to learn everything you can about what your money buys you at newjordans2018.com
  18. Nike Kobe 9 Elite Performance test Traction – The best traction I’ve ever had has come from two shoes… the Air Jordan XX8 and the Air Penny 5. I can now add the Nike Kobe 9 Elite to that list. In fact, It’d be tied with the Air Jordan XX8 for that #1 spot. Yeah… its that freaking good. It must be a combination of the pattern itself and the thin rubber. You receive such a natural feeling when maneuvering that its almost as if you can feel the floor beneath your toes. Outdoor players will want to stay away from these as that thin rubber will likely wear out very quickly. How quickly? Wait here while I go grab my sneaker wear and tear calculator… Cushion – These feature the same system as the Kobe 11 . If you enjoyed the full length Lunarlon midsole then you’ll be pretty pleased here. If you bought any of the other Kobe 8 models that featured different cushion setups and foams then you can easily swap them out for a different/ custom ride. The greatest part is that you can use the LeBron 11 Lunarlon/ Zoom Air midsole in these bad boys so if low profile isn’t quite your thing then all you have to do is swap them out with the LeBron midsole and you’re good to go. Material – Flyknit, Fuse and some really sweet looking Carbon Fiber panels are the main materials used. Flyknit is abundant throughout and backed by a very thin TPU/ Fuse for some additional structure and support. Why would they use Flyknit if they were going to use Fuse? I don’t know… why would they use Engineered Mesh if they were just going to use Fuse? Obviously basketball and running have two different styles of movement. For added security the thin layer of Fuse was put in place to ensure the structural integrity isn’t compromised during play. Fit – As mentioned in their First Impression, there is a bit of dead space within the toe but I still would recommend going true to size. Length wise, everything fits fine, there just seems to be a bit of extra volume in these that I personally prefer to not have. LeBron would probably love how they fit whereas I prefer the snug fit from the LeBron 11. Speaking of the LeBron 14 for sale… you can use that midsole that I went over in the cushion section to help add a slight lift within the shoe thus taking up the dead space within. Were they horribly sloppy without the LeBron midsole? Not at all, quite the opposite… I just like how it feels when the shoe is touching my foot… makes me feel more secure. Lockdown is great throughout the shoe, especially in the heel… no, not because they are really high cut. Its because the Flyknit in that area fits like a sock so you have something that really hugs and contains without limiting any restriction. A high that plays like a low. I do feel the collar height is unnecessary as I achieve perfect lockdown from the third to last eyelet but for those that wish to enable their mental placebo… these will work well for that. Ventilation – Definitely not their strong suit. The tongue and toebox perforations are the only true points of ventilation. Its nothing horrible but its noteworthy for those that wish to have something a little more breathable. Support – Yes,they are ridiculously high… no, that’s not where their support comes from. Their fit, however, keeps your foot in place along the midfoot and heel which is exactly what helps support the foot upon movements. No shifting or sliding around within the shoe at all and the Carbon Fiber heel panels help ensure that no slipping will occur upon lateral movements. You’ll be able to play the way you want to while being very well protected from a support standpoint. What about the lack of shank plate? That was easier for me to describe visually so I go over that in the video above. Overall – I love playing in the Nike Kobe 9 Elite. They offer everything I personally want and need. Excellent traction, great cushion, nice materials with a supportive yet mobile fit and support for lateral movements. If you happen to want or need more cushion then that is an option, so long as you own a pair of LeBron 11’s. I would have loved to have seen these in a lower cut. A high top would have still been fine… just not this high since that’s just extra material that doesn’t need to be there. However, If you are able to get your hands on a pair then I highly recommend them. Last year the Air Jordan XX8 was my top shoe of the year ever since their February launch… history has found a way to repeat itself on newjordans2018.com…
  19. Each year a new signature Air Jordan model is released along with retro models and is the most popular sneaker in history. Today we share the three hot sale Jordan Brand lifestyle sneakers 1. Air Jordan 12 Dark Grey Hot Sale The Air Jordan 12 Dark Grey is a brand new colorway which will debut during the Fall season.this Air Jordan 12 comes dressed in a Dark Grey and Wolf Grey color combination. Utilizing Dark Grey on the suede uppers and leather basketball textured overlay. Following we have Wolf Grey applied to the Jumpman branding, Two 3 running down the tongue and outsole. Completing the look while giving them a premium theme is Metallic Gold on the top two eyelets and the top of the back heel pull tabs which is a nod to the Taxi Air Jordan 12. The Air Jordan 12 Dark Grey will release at select Jordan Brand retailers including online at Ni 2.New Love Air Jordan 1 Flyknit For Sale We have seen a handful of Air Jordan 1 Flyknit releases take place and we can expect a few more including the ‘Shadow’ and ‘BHM’ edition. Not only that, Jordan Brand plans to apply Flyknit to more retro models. As some of you may know, Jordan Brand brought back the ‘New Love’ Air Jordan 1 earlier in the year. While it released in traditional form which includes a leather upper, how many of you would like to see a Air Jordan 1 Flyknit edition. We now have a preview of the New Love Air Jordan 1 Flyknit which allows us to see what a potential release would look like. While not an official release or custom but a photoshop done by Nick Pearson who goes by sneakerjunkienz. 3.Air Jordan 6 ‘Wheat’ The Air Jordan 6 ‘Wheat’ has been added to the upcoming lineup of releases for the colder months. Dressed in a Fall ready theme, this Air Jordan 6 is highlighted with Golden Harvest. Looking closer at this Air Jordan 6, they come dressed in a Golden Harvest and Sail color combination. Across the uppers we have suede while dressed in predominate Wheat. That same shade extends onto the tongue and back heel tab. Following is the use of Sail that lands on the Jumpman branding and across the midsole. The last touch is a milky translucent outsole which completes the look. Air Jordan 6 Wheat Release Date The Wheat Air Jordan 6 is scheduled to release at select Jordans 2018 retailers during November 2017. Upon it’s release, the retail price is set at $110.. If You Like these jordan shoes ,please go to hoop jordan buy one, thanks
  20. The Under Armour Curry 4 feels like the true successor to the Curry 2. YOU CAN FIND THE UA CURRY 4 AVAILABLE AT hoopjordan.com STARTING OCTOBER 27. Traction – Herringbone is missing from the Curry line for the very first time, and while we love our herringbone, it wasn’t actually missed. The spiral pattern put in place offers multi-directional coverage for any move performed at any time. Linear coverage is fantastic and lateral coverage is handled very well too. When dust is present the tackiness of the rubber compound used (on translucent outsole options) attracts dust like a magnet. Wiping will be very necessary if you happen to play on a poorly maintained court, but when you’re not wiping things are still able to stick until you have the time to clear things out. One of the courts I play on feels slick even after its been cleaned — it likely needs to be refinished — and the Curry 4 Warriors for sale was still able to hold its own. With the translucent playing so well on some terrible courts it makes me wonder how much more awesome solid rubber versions of the outsole will perform. If you aren’t using herringbone, use this. This was awesome. Cushion – Tech specs for the Curry 4 were released after I had recorded the video performance review. However, we still didn’t learn much about the cushion. All that we have been told is that UA is incorporating a proprietary foam compound for responsiveness underfoot. Whether or not this foam is Charged, a new form of Micro G, or something else entirely is still up in the air. However, I do know how the cushion felt underfoot and the best word I can use to describe it is minimal. Not quite Kyrie minimal, but minimal enough to allow for court feel and some minor impact protection. You can always swap out the insole for some additional coverage (I was fine with the stock insole) but this isn’t the shoe for people looking for cushioning. Much like the Curry models of the past, these are all about control, court feel, and stability. If these are attributes you require out of your shoes then you’re going to love how these play. Again, if you’re looking for something with a ton of cushion then these simply weren’t meant for you. What I like most about the Curry 4 low warriors yellow for sale midsole tooling is that it offers a minimal setup and the shoe owns it. The Curry 3 was super firm and thick for no reason. You rode high off the floor without the benefit of having a well-cushioned ride. That wound up making the 3 feel heavy and clunky underfoot. It was stable, but you can achieve greater stability by bringing yourself down to the floor — that will make you feel lighter on your feet and quicker. This was not the case with the Curry 4 because what you see is what you get. I feel the perfect setup for these would have been this exact midsole setup with the addition of a Micro G insole; luckily, I still have a few of those stashed away from older UA models. That combination gives you a little more feedback from the foam insole while retaining all of the attributes the Curry 4 offers. Materials – Threadborne looks to have been a one and done type of material from the Curry line because we now have a modern knit along the upper. Sitting atop the knit is a synthetic leather overlay that adds a little bit of reinforcement to the minimally structured shoe. So far, this setup has proven to be effective on-court while remaining durable. The synthetic breaks in very nicely and mimics leather in a way that I hadn’t expected. Once the knitted upper breaks in and conforms to your foot you end up with a shoe that feels like it was molded around your foot shape — not just some generic last. Fit – Going true to size is crucial because the upper is very minimalistic. The entire shoe feels like its suffocating your feet when you first put them on but the break-in process does wonders for the fit. Side note: I keep reading on other forums that players wear a shoe one time and decide that the shoe is not for them, noting complaints about material stiffness. Shoes often require break-in time. I’m not sure why consumers nowadays are unwilling to break in shoes. The shoes were not built around their foot shape so why would they feel like they were after a single wear for two hours? Leather shoes never felt perfect straight out of the box. Fuse-based shoes required tons of breaking in before feeling nice. Many consumers have become lazy and impatient. Hopefully, things change for the better, where consumers are well versed on what products offer and why those offerings may or may not work for them rather than just going for something and being pissed that it wasn’t perfect from the start. End rant. Now, if you choose to go up half size on the Curry 4 because you have wide feet and wish to not break-in your shoe then you will compromise the fit and overall support. If you do this you may injure yourself because you’ve made it so the shoe’s design no longer works as intended. Not every shoe was made for every person. Find a shoe that was made for you, or break in one, and you’ll be surprised at how awesome it is. Lockdown on the Curry 4 was excellent. The entire shoe is a sock, a very tight sock. You ride inside portions of the footbed (midsole) and once you lace up you’re locked in. Being low to the ground also helps with the minimal upper — everything here feels like it had a lot of thought put into it and if it’s here, there’s for a reason. Having this upper on the Curry 3s tooling would have been disastrous because your foot would sit on top of that midsole rather than in it, and I don’t think this upper wouldn’t have been able to handle all types of lateral movements on its own. To sum things up: go true to size. Break in the shoe if it’s a little snug at first and you’ll thank yourself later. Support – Despite being a minimal shoe, the support is solid. The overall support doesn’t rely on the upper, other than the fit, but more so on the way everything works together. The way your foot rests inside the shoe, the way the midsole is sculpted in the rear and lateral forefoot — all of it works very well together. Everything feels very anatomical and I like it a lot. If I were to enhance anything it would have been the internal heel counter. I would have liked it a little bigger and covering more area. The way it’s implemented currently wasn’t a deal breaker because I love playing in the shoe, but it’s the one thing I feel could have been improved upon. Otherwise, the way the outsole sits on the floor, moves with the upper, and moves with the wearer’s foot feels effortless on new jordans 2018. Overall – The Curry 4 feels like it should have come after the Curry 2. It provides a better fit, greater stability, and more control. These are all things the Curry 2 had going for it and it feels like these attributes roll over into the Curry 4 a bit more seamlessly than it had in the 3. If Under Armour can continue its basketball line with this type of performance then it will have hit a nice stride moving forward. Not only do I love the Curry 4, but now I’m really excited for the Curry 5.
  21. Look at These Nike Lebron 15 Deconstruction Test We’ve begun testing the Nike LeBron 15 but if you wanted to know all the ins and outs of LeBron James’ latest sneaker then here is a detailed deconstruction by newjordans2018.com. While I don’t particularly enjoy seeing a perfectly good shoe cut in half when someone less fortunate could have used them, it’s for educational purposes and the findings are usually not mentioned by the brands themselves. However, this is my favorite look at these deconstruction breakdowns. As a shoe nerd, it’s just really freaking cool to see the shoe and all of its “guts” like this — really freaking cool. The Nike LeBron 15 has been examined top to bottom; every component that makes up the sneaker is carefully deconstructed and dissected. The tooling is what most tend to focus on because it is the extension of your foot and it can make or break your wearing experience. Are they comfortable? Stable? Supportive? Not only do we test these attributes personally, but it’s nice to actually see what makes up those attributes within the design. You can see the sockliner/insole and it’s Ortholite. Often, people ask me which OrthoLite is the best or most premium. These light blue ones aren’t it — they’re the cheapest but provide decent step-in comfort. I’ve found that the denser dark blue ones are some of the best, along with the yellow ones. Those offer the most cushion and last the longest. A popular thing to do nowadays is add a thin foam layer in addition to the typical strobel board. While thin, it does add an extra level of comfort — I know it may be hard to believe, but it’s true. If you were to try on the same shoe but one featured this additional layer while the other did not, you would (or should) feel a small difference between the two. Located under this foam layer is the more traditional strobel. It’s what the upper of the shoe is sewn onto once fit and shaped around whichever last the brand decided to use on the shoe. Another interesting thing note is that signature shoes are not fitted to a last that is specific to the signature athlete. The athlete’s personal pair is fitted to a custom last, but the retail runs are fitted around lasts that the brand and design teams feel suits the market best. In Asia brands tend to use a wider last due to wide feet being more common in that part of the world. In the U.S. we can see a variety of lasts used — usually not on the same shoe but spread across different models — that cater to those with normal, narrow, and wide feet. There are even some brands like New Balance that will make one model using different lasts that vary upon widths. You’ll usually see those widths listed when looking for a pair in your size. A much larger torsional plate is used on the LeBron 15 than what we see in Nike’s lower priced offerings. With the tooling here being so flexible, the added support and coverage is needed to avoid overstraining and foot fatigue. You can see here that the midsole sculpt is meant to cradle the foot a bit. Something I’ve noticed while testing the sneaker is that this is actually negated by the additional layers like the dual strobel boards and sock liner. The scuplt should have lipped up a bit more to truly cup the foot properly — at least in the lateral forefoot. However, the shoe still doesn’t ride quite as high as it may look at first glance. This is why I love these breakdowns. You get to truly learn about the footwear that you wear. The forefoot Zoom unit is roughly 16mm thick. I say roughly because the midsole is still partially attached. But you get the point, it’s a fat Air unit. It isn’t quite as fat as the midfoot Zoom unit, which is roughly 17mm. And neither is as fat as the rear Air unit which sits at roughly 19mm thick. Which is really thick for an Air unit — Zoom Air that is. This is why Nike combines Air Max pillars within the Air bladder alongside the Zoom Air’s tensile fibers. At this thickness the heel would be unstable, but the pillars help maintain stability while still allowing the heel’s strike zone to sit directly over the Zoom Air. The heel has an additional layer of foam injected into the pillars, something we first saw implemented with the Nike LeBron 14. This makes the heel a bit more forgiving upon impact — for those that happen to strike with their heel, of course. The upper is what Nike calls BattleKnit, aka really thick Flyknit. The layer in between your foot and the Flyknit is there to add some comfort and protection against anything that may be considered rough or unfinished — knots, seams, pressure from the Flywire cables, etc. This is the inside of the BattleKnit. You can see where things are glued (darker portions) and where things are tightly knitted together (everything else). Trusting Flywire cables to be your only source of lockdown from the lacing area is risky. So far, it’s been working, but I get more peace of mind when there are more traditional lace holes in addition to Flywire acting as reinforcement rather than the front line. The heel counter is slimmed down but has been effective so far. It lips and cups the foot better than the forefoot section of the midsole, which you can see below. That takes care of the Nike LeBron 15 deconstruction. Stay tuned for performance reviews in the coming weeks and let us know what you think about the Nike LeBron 15 so far down below in the comment section. I know some people are currently playing in the ‘Ghost’ colorway so any input you have from your experiences thus far are always appreciated.
  22. Air Jordan 8 Retro Performance Review Traction – Surprised would be an understatement. These early Air Jordan’s have some of the best traction when there is literally no true pattern involved… it’s mind boggling. To be perfectly honest… the actual Air Jordan 13 offers better overall traction than the herringbone laced Air Jordan 8. Cushion – The cushion wasn’t as bad as I thought it would have been. It’s definitely not the best shoe in terms of cushion but for what it is it’s adequate. If cushion is your main focus and you wish to have the Retro styling then this is where to Air Jordan 8.0 shines… the Phylon that replaced the Polyurethane makes a huge difference while the Air Units used are directly under foot instead of the original placement – inside the PU midsole. Material – I don’t have a pair of the Countdown Pack Air Jordan VIII’s but this version has great leather… almost identical to what was used on the leather based AJ8.0’s. Break-in time is nearly nonexistent and if you were to choose a nubuck pair it shouldn’t hurt the overall performance due to the cross straps. Fit – A true to size fit is features and when fully laced (to the top) they are snug and secure. Having the inner boot gives you a very plush feeling around your foot for a comfortable fit from heel to toe. Lockdown the cross straps and you have one of the best fitting sneakers that happen to not restrict your ankle one bit. Ventilation – This part is pretty self-explanatory… ventilation sucks. The Air Jordan VI still has the best ventilation and air flow so far in the new jordans 2018. Support – The overall fit provides all the support you need. With the exceptional lockdown fit, you are stable and secure the entire time on-court. Located at the heel are the paint graphics which offer minor medial and lateral support but not quite as good as the updated TPU versions found in the nike kobe 11 bruce lee. Overall – When I first laced these up I wasn’t too excited… after roughly five minutes of playing them they quickly became my favorite Air Jordan from a performance perspective out of those that have been tested thus far… I predict that these will be the best performing Air Jordan between the early 1-9 models… followed closely by the newjordans2018.com Bottom line… if you want to play in a Retro you can. Anyone that says anything otherwise probably can’t ball.
  23. Hit the jump for full review… Traction – The traction surface was much like the Air Jordan II, performed well no matter what you were doing. Texture is abundant throughout and the giant pivot point did not hinder their performance at all. Out of the first three Jordan release dates 2018 models, the AJ1 has been the most equipped where traction is concerned but the AJ2 & 3 are well above average. Cushion – As you already know, my knees and legs cannot handle the cushion. The polyurethane midsoles are far too dense for me and even with an insole swap I was only partially pain-free until a certain point. There is some compression which is good but overall… it’s just not an ideal setup. If you are young, you won’t have much of an issue but for some of us older players, especially older players who can still run quickly, we need to be able to absorb as much impact as possible so our bodies can endure on-court play. Material – The leather upper is decent enough and has some durability to it. Flexibility of the material itself was actually pretty good and I had no real issues with it. As far as the lighter grey panels… quite possibly the cheapest materials one could find were used and that is where I was irritated. Had I used the Air Jordan 3 True Blue For Sale colorway, this may not have been a problem but this particular version left much to be desired with those panels. Fit – The areas covered with eyelets were great. I experienced a thorough lockdown from the midfoot to the heel. When moving at a rapid pace and quickly changing direction, the forefoot was unable to handle the torque applied to the materials so that was a slight drawback as you could feel your forefoot slip a bit when enough pressure is used. Overall, I can’t really complain as this is common amongst shoes from the 80’s & 90’s so for what it’s worth, it did its job for the most part. Ventilation – There wasn’t any… While there are perforations, they don’t puncture through the material completely so they are more for looks rather than serve a purpose. This caused the material to soften up while playing – trapping heat and moisture inside – but again, ventilation wasn’t as popular back in this era so it’s to be expected. Support – The arch is sculpted providing you with a better fit and support while flexing the foot. I wish I could say the rubber heel cup worked but it wasn’t used as well as it had been in the Air Jordan 2. All things considered, the fit from the midfoot to heel was substantial enough to where this didn’t hinder performance too much as a whole. Overall – The real killer here is the midsole. Polyurethane is still used today for insoles but rarely for midsoles. Even when being used in today’s footwear, it’s accompanied by some sort of foam which absorbs most of the impact before it reaches the PU insole. Had the cushion been more protective, I think the Air Jordan 3 would have made a very good performance shoe. This is actually a model I’d like to see receive the ‘.0’ treatment… Air Jordan 3.0 anyone? Basically… if you are young, these won’t hurt you too much. For those of us who have been playing Basketball since we were 11… our bodies have been abused to a point to where we need a bit more out of our shoes than just the ’basics’ at newjordans2018.com
  24. Three of the most popular Jordan shoes releasing on holiday 2017 Jordan Brand recently unveiled their Holiday 2017 release dates part of the Air Jordan 2017 Holiday Collection. Some of the highlights includes both Air Jordan 6 releases that receive the ‘Gatorade’ moniker. In addition there is the Air Jordan 6 and Air Jordan 1 Flyknit Shadow’ which is inspired by the Chiago Continue to scroll below to check out more images and see what else is coming from Jordan Brand during the Holiday 2017 season three style popular most popular 1.Air Jordan 6 Wheat Release on November 22 2017 The Air Jordan 6 Wheat has been added to the upcoming lineup of releases for the colder months. Dressed in a Fall ready theme, this Air Jordan 6 is highlighted with Golden Harvest. Looking closer at this Air Jordan 6, they come dressed in a Golden Harvest and Sail color combination. Across the uppers we have suede while dressed in predominate Wheat. That same shade extends onto the tongue and back heel tab. Following is the use of Sail that lands on the Jumpman branding and across the midsole. The last touch is a milky translucent outsole which completes the look. Air Jordan 6 Wheat Golden Harvest/Sail-Golden Harvest November 22, 2017 384664-705 $190 2.Air Jordan 6 Gatorade Green Suede Release On December 2017 During the 1990s, everyone wanted to ‘Be Like Mike’ due to Michael Jordan starring in Gatorade commercials. Jordan Brand will be celebrating this era by releasing two Air Jordan 6 colorways. One comes in White, Orange and Green which resembles that of the Carmine while the second features Green Suede and is rumored to be a limited Quckstrike release. Showcased here is the Air Jordan 6 Gatorade ‘Green Suede’ which is different from the sample we first spotted. They have replaced the White midsole and has used Green throughout. Following we have Orange accents throughout, Gatorade branding on the lace locks and a translucent outsole. The look is then completed with ‘If I Could Be’ on the inside of the tongues and branding on the insoles. Air Jordan 6 NRG G8RD Pine Green/Orange Blaze-Pine Green December 2017 AJ5986-335 $225 3. Air Jordan 1 Flyknit Shadow Release date on 2018 Spring jordan release date 2018 will bring us the return of the Air Jordan 1 Shadow which everyone is excited for. Jordan Brand looks to be releasing a matching Air Jordan 1 Flyknit ‘Shadow’ in the future. This Air Jordan 1 mimics the original colorway while being dressed in Black, Medium Grey and White. Across the entire uppers is Flyknit which is covered in Black and Grey. In addition we have leather used on the Wings branding and Nike Swoosh. Other details includes White on the midsole and Grey on the outsole. In order to guiding you to find the next big Jordan release , we will keep up update timely to you and ensuring you never miss out. Not only do we have the launch dates available, but the prices, colorways, style codes , performance review and guiding you buying the latest release on newjordans2018.com